How do you want to be remembered?

I spent the day helping with the funeral. Afterward, at the luncheon, I heard family and friends telling the stories of how he will be remembered.

Fr. Steve of St. Joseph's Indian School
Tuesday, August 03, 2010

Saying goodbye
Ron, a 69 year-old rancher from my former parish in Stephan, died after a long and painful battle with cancer. He died in the same house he grew up and lived all his life. He knew the cancer was terminal. When I talked to him a few weeks ago, he had come to a sense of peace and acceptance about that.

Ron knew a lot about many things; but, what I admired most was that instead of pontificating about what he believed, he asked, “What do you think about . . . ?” He was anxious to learn, and because of that, he had a lot of wisdom.

Remembering Ron
I spent the day helping with the funeral. Afterward, at the luncheon, I heard family and friends telling the stories of how he will be remembered. One of his sons recalled how Ron would give them a ranch chore and then pressure them to get done by a deadline; however, he wouldn’t tell them HOW they had to do it. Many of their days were spent experimenting with homemade gadgets that sometimes worked great; other times leaving them working late to make up for their mistakes. In allowing them to try different things, they learned.

The freedom to grow
I think God is like that too. We all have a broad outline of what we have to do – love God and our neighbor – but we each have to find unique ways to do that. In giving us freedom, God allows us to make mistakes … and hopes that we can learn from them.

Author: St. Joseph's Indian School

At St. Joseph's Indian School, our privately-funded programs for Lakota (Sioux) children in need have evolved over 89 years of family partnership, experience and education. Because of generous friends who share tax-deductible donations, Native American youth receive a safe, stable home life; individual counseling and guidance; carefully planned curriculum based on Lakota culture and individual student needs and tools to help build confidence, boost self-esteem and improve cultural awareness. All of this helps children to live a bright, productive, possibility-filled future.

2 thoughts on “How do you want to be remembered?”

  1. I have been allowed to make a LOT of mistakes, but thankfully I think I’ve leaned from most of them. Ron sounds like a good Dad … his sons were fortunate in that.

  2. Here lies Les Moore
    One shot from a .44
    No Les
    No Moore.
    From Tombstone, Az…Not a bad way to be remembered….I guess..no less..!
    U.R. Always in our prayers..
    Mia and Bob

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