Meet our 2018 Powwow Royalty

After competing against a number of other students, Mariah, Vincent and Rico were chosen as the 2018 St. Joseph’s Royalty!

After competitions in dance and a Q&A with judges, St. Joseph’s Indian School has crowned three students as the 2018 royalty for the 42nd Annual Powwow. Learn more about Mariah, Rico and Vincent!

Miss St. Joseph’s: Mariah
Mariah is a jingle, fancy and traditional dancer who has been dancing for 4 years.

Q: Why did you want to be Miss St. Joseph’s?
A: So I can represent my school, my tribe and my family. I also want to be a role model for others.

Q: At which other powwows have you danced other than St. Joseph’s?
A: Fort Thompson and Chamberlain

Q: How did you learn to dance?
A: I watched other people dance. I have also tried to practice by myself and do the new technique I learned.

Q: Describe what you feel like when you dance in your regalia at a powwow.
A: I feel like I’m myself and that I can express myself when dancing. I feel like I’m respecting the world.

Q: List other activities you’ve taken part in that include the Native American culture.
A: Powwow, hand games, Native American Studies and sweat ceremonies

Jr. Miss St. Joseph’s: Rico
Rico is a fancy dancer who has been dancing for about 10 years.

Q: Why did you want to be Jr. Miss St. Joseph’s?
A: I want to represent my tribe, family and the girls in my St. Joseph’s home!

Q: At which other powwows have you danced other than St. Joseph’s?
A: Lake Andes, Fort Randall and Fort Thompson

Q: How did you learn to dance?
A: My mom taught me how to dance when I was 2 years old.

Q: Describe what you feel like when you dance in your regalia at a powwow.
A: I feel like people are cheering for me and then I start to feel proud.

Q: What do you do to help others?
A: Sometimes when I see younger students having trouble dancing I help them do their footwork or make their own kind of footwork.

Eagle Staff Bearer: Vincent
Vincent is a traditional and grass dancer who has been dancing for five years.

Q: Why did you want to be Eagle Staff Bearer?
A: To represent my family and myself.

Q: How did you learn to dance?
A: Other students and LaRayne (St. Joseph’s Native American Studies teacher)

Q: Describe what you feel like when you dance in your regalia at a powwow.
A: I feel with the drum.

Note: In order to be chosen for Miss St. Joseph’s, Jr. Miss St. Joseph’s and Eagle Staff Bearer, our Lakota students must attend and represent St. Joseph’s with pride and respect at powwows and other events. They must also be good role models and demonstrate a good attitude toward all students and adults.

Author: St. Joseph's Indian School

At St. Joseph's Indian School, our privately-funded programs for Lakota (Sioux) children in need have evolved over 89 years of family partnership, experience and education. Because of generous friends who share tax-deductible donations, Native American youth receive a safe, stable home life; individual counseling and guidance; carefully planned curriculum based on Lakota culture and individual student needs and tools to help build confidence, boost self-esteem and improve cultural awareness. All of this helps children to live a bright, productive, possibility-filled future.

10 thoughts on “Meet our 2018 Powwow Royalty”

  1. This was our first visit to St Joseph. My companion and I were very impressed with the hospitality and openess of everyone we encountered. We look forward to a return visit in the coming years. Peace and Love!

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