Our Tiyospaye – extended family

Speaking of blood, since my clotting factor was too high last week, I had more blood work today. My level stabilized and is where the doctors want it.

Fr. Steve of St. Joseph's Indian School
Monday, August 02, 2010

New Staff
This morning I welcomed our seven new houseparents and one new teacher as they began their week of orientation. Three are South Dakota residents; one couple is from Michigan. The others represent Oklahoma, Louisiana and Ohio.

We get the most geographic diversity within the houseparent job. Most of our staff have local roots. The newcomers bring lots of enthusiasm, plenty of questions, and a little bit of anxiety as they tackle this new endeavor.

Mike, our Executive Director of Child Services, spoke about his first years as a houseparent. There are days that are fun and memorable; other days when the students frustrate and upset you terribly. He encouraged everyone to work through both the good and the bad. It’s the whole mix of admiring kids at their finest, and working with them at their lowest, that really makes the job get into your blood.

Doctor visit
Speaking of blood, since my clotting factor was too high last week, I had more blood work today. My level stabilized and is where the doctors want it.

Our Tiyospaye – extended family
Darby – who works on our computers – was back at work today after becoming a brand new Dad for the first time last week. His wife and son are both doing well. He just needs to have a “man-to-man” talk with his son about keeping it a little quieter in the middle of the night.

Encounters like this remind me that besides the students we serve and friends like you, our staff have family and loved ones that become part of our Tiyospayeextended family.

Author: St. Joseph's Indian School

At St. Joseph's Indian School, our privately-funded programs for Lakota (Sioux) children in need have evolved over 89 years of family partnership, experience and education. Because of generous friends who share tax-deductible donations, Native American youth receive a safe, stable home life; individual counseling and guidance; carefully planned curriculum based on Lakota culture and individual student needs and tools to help build confidence, boost self-esteem and improve cultural awareness. All of this helps children to live a bright, productive, possibility-filled future.

4 thoughts on “Our Tiyospaye – extended family”

  1. I LOVE reading about the wonderful things that are taking place. I am so happy that the blood test are where they should be. Life is BEAUTIFUL, if we would only learn that there is BEAUTY in ALL created; as it was created with LOVE. Patience is the greatest VIRTUE, and our children teach us patience.
    GOD BLESS’-
    Cynthia

  2. TOLD YOU ALL I AM FROM MO MULE STATE. I FOUND OUT I,VE BEEN WALKING ON A BROKAN BONE BELOW MY LEFT KNEE TWO WEEKS NEVEN

  3. Yeppers..Children teach us a lot. And look how many you have, Fr. Steve ! That is the reason you are so dad gum smart..! You are right in the middle of the most important University on Earth..!
    But only God issues the official degree from there. It takes awhile to earn..BUT we understand it is well worth the time spent..
    Prayers,
    Always,
    Mia and Bob

  4. Dear Fr. Steve,

    Hope that soesn’t mean bad news for you. Glad your numbers came back down.

    Congratulations to Darby and his wife on the arrival of their new son.

    Love to all and as always our prayers are with you and all in our extended family. We’re happy to welcome Darby, his wife and new son into that extended family.

    God Bless,

    Nancy & Kenny

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